Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court is the treaty that established the International Criminal Court.  It was adopted on July 17, 1998 and went into force on July 1, 2002.  About 110 states are parties to the statute, and a further 38 states have signed the treaty without ratifying it.  Among other things, the statute establishes the court’s functions, jurisdiction and structure.

The Statute of the International Criminal Court was a result of negotiations aimed at establishing a permanent international tribunal to punish individuals committing genocide and other serious international crimes.  The United Nations General Assembly convened a diplomatic conference in Rome that finalized and adopted a convention on the establishment of an international criminal court.

Full text of Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court


Inside Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court